Midterm Elections 2014: Live Updates - Live Blogs & Updates - ABCNews

Midterm Elections 2014: Live Updates

It’s Election Day 2014! With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, voters across the nation are heading to the polls to cast their ballots after a roller coaster midterm election cycle. There are 36 Senate seats up for grabs this year, 36 governorships and all 435 U.S. House seats. ABC News will be live blogging the results.

  • GRIMES FLYER REMINISCENT OF OBAMA POSTER

    ABC's JEFF ZELENY: Alison Lundergan Grimes tried to do one thing above all else: Distance herself from President Obama. 

    This flyer from the Republican Party of Kentucky made that task all the more challenging.

    Grimes famously declined to say whether she voted for Obama, but that likely mattered very little. This fancy – and expensive – mailer made it almost impossible.


  • IF YOU GIVE THE GOP A COOKIE...

    ABC's MATT LAROTONDA:  A line is forming outside the RNC headquarters right now, but it's not to get inside for their 10:00 PM election update. No, a cookies and milk food truck has been hired to servetheir weary souls delicious treats before what will be a long night. It's free for RNC staffers but everyone else pays full price, this reporter included.

    by Michael Falcone edited by Erin Dooley 11/5/2014 12:49:48 AM
  • KASICH PROJECTED TO DEFEAT FITZGERALD IN OHIO

    ABC's ALEX MALLIN: 
    ABC News has projected Republican Gov. John Kasich to defeat his Democratic opponent Ed FitzGerald, based on analysis of exit polls. Kasich initially had to fight off FitzGerald as he faced somewhat-dwindling poll numbers during his first term, but FitzGerald’s personal life was thrown into the spotlight this campaign cycle and Kasich was able to maintain double-digit leads in various polls leading up to Election Day. 

    Kasich was largely criticized among Republicans after Ohio accepted expanded Medicaid funds offered to states under the Affordable Care Act, still many believe Kasich remains as a potential contender in the 2016 GOP presidential field. Mary Taylor will stay on as Kasich’s lieutenant Governor. 




    by Erin Dooley edited by Michael Falcone 11/5/2014 12:42:08 AM
  • IF YOU GIVE THE GOP A COOKIE...

    ABC's MATT LAROTONDA: A line is forming outside the RNC headquarters right now, but it's not to get inside for their 10:00 PM election update.

    No, a cookies and milk food truck has been hired to serve their weary souls delicious treats before what will be a long night. It's free for RNC staffers but everyone else pays full price, this reporter included.
  • SHELLY MOORE CAPITO PROJECTED TO WIN WEST VIRGINIA SENATE SEAT 

    ABC's BEN SIEGEL: Based on analysis of exit polls, ABC News has projected Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.V., will win West Virginia’s open Senate seat held by retiring Democratic Sen. Jay Rockefeller.

    Capito, who has defeated Democratic candidate Natalie Tennant, will be West Virginia’s first female senator and the second Republican senator since World War II. 

    Capito tied Tennant to President Obama’s unpopularity and his environmental positions, which resonated with voters in the coal-producing state.




  • FLORIDA GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE FILES EMERGENCY REQUEST FOR EXTENDED VOTING HOURS 

    ABC's MARYALICE PARKS: Florida Democratic Challenger Charlie Crist has filed a motion with the Circuit Court for the 17th Judicial Circuit asking for extended voting hours in Broward County. The county, which includes Fort Lauderdale, is understood to be a Democrat stronghold. It is represented by Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

    The request cites mechanical errors at several polling stations. Crist’s campaign manager tweeted around 6:30PM: “The campaign is filing an emergency motion to extend voting hours in Broward County from 7pm to 9pm. See the motion: http://chrl.ie/Motion” 




    by Erin Dooley edited by Michael Falcone 11/5/2014 12:13:19 AM


  • MITCH MCCONNELL PROJECTED TO WIN KENTUCKY SENATE RACE 

    ABC's ARLETTE SAENZ:Based on a preliminary analysis of exit polls, ABC News has projected Republican Senator Mitch McConnell will win his Kentucky Senate seat Tuesday night, putting him one step closer to becoming the next Senate Majority Leader should Republicans take control of the Senate. The 72-year-old current Senate Minority Leader beat Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, Kentucky’s Secretary of State, in one of the country’s most closely watched races.


    Democrats hoped to unseat McConnell, who has represented Kentucky in the Senate for thirty years, but Grimes lost steam in recent weeks when she refused to disclose whether she voted for President Obama.  McConnell will now be closely watching whether Republicans are able to pick up enough seats to seize control of the Senate.


    "I think we're going to have a good day here in Kentucky and, hopefully, around the country," McConnell said after voting in Louisville. “I'm hoping we're going to have a new majority to take America in a different direction.” 






    by Erin Dooley edited by Michael Falcone 11/5/2014 12:01:19 AM
  • DISCONTENT AMONG ARKANSAS VOTERS HIGHEST IN THE COUNTRY 

    ABC's GARY LANGER: According to the preliminary exit poll data, here are three facts about voters in Arkansas, where Democratic incumbent Mark Pryor is fighting 5to keep his seat from Republican Tom Cotton.  

    • Discontent among Arkansas voters is among the highest in the country; 72 percent think the country is headed seriously off on the wrong track and two-thirds disapprove of Obama’s job performance.

    • A majority, 54 percent, think the healthcare law went too far.

    • Turnout among Democrats is at a low, 29 percent, in Senate exit poll data since 1992.                                        

  • IN GENERAL, WEST VIRGINIA VOTERS DON'T LOVE OBAMA
    ABC's GARY LANGER: National exit poll data shows West Virginia has lowest approval rating of Obama and highest percentage of voters who think the country is on the wrong track.
     

     Highest wrong track: West Virginia, at 78 percent

     Lowest wrong track: Minnesota, at 52 percent

     Lowest Obama approval: West Virginia, at 28 percent  

     Highest Obama approval: Michigan, at 50 percent

  • MAJORITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE VOTERS THINK BROWN HAS NOT LIVED IN THE STATE LONG ENOUGH


    ABC's GARY LANGER: According to the preliminary exit poll data, here are three facts about voters in New Hampshire, where Democratic incumbent Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is trying to fend off a challenge from Republican Scott Brown. 


    • Rejecting carpetbagger charges, 54 percent think Brown has not lived in NH long enough to represent the state effectively.


    • More NH voters are upset with GOP leaders in Congress than they are with Obama, 67 vs. 57 percent.


    • Democrats and Republicans are about at parity in the state - with a plurality of voters, 44 percent, describing themselves as independents.



  • DEMOCRATIC TURNOUT IN COLORADO AT A RECORD LOW SINCE 1992

    ABC's GARY LANGER: According to the preliminary exit poll data, here are three facts about voters in Colorado, where Democratic Sen. Mark Udall is fending off Republican challenger Cory Gardner:

    Turnout among Democrats is at 28 percent, a record low in CO Senate races dating back to 1992.

    55 percent of voters disapprove of the job Obama’s doing as president, and nearly half think his 2010 health care law went too far.

    Eight in 10 CO voters are white, similar to their levels in 2010 and 2008. Thirteen percent are Hispanic.


  • MAJORITY OF VOTERS IN KENTUCKY THINK THE COUNTRY IS ON THE WRONG TRACK

    ABC’s GARY LANGER: According to preliminary exit poll data, here are four facts about voters in Kentucky – home to one of the most competitive Senate races of this election cycle: 

    Turnout among nonwhites is down 4 points from 2008, when Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R) won re-election, to only 11 percent of voters.

    69 percent of voters say the country’s seriously off on the wrong track, similar to the number who said so when the Republican candidate won the KY Senate race in the last midterm in 2010.

    82 percent are worried about the direction of the economy (similar to 2010 and 2008) and 51 percent say the economy’s the most important issue, well more than any of the four other issues tested.

    61 percent of KY voters disapprove of Obama’s job performance; 45 percent say his 2010 health care law went too far.




  • MIDTERMS COST MORE THAN SMALL COUNTRIES' GDPS

    ABC's CHRIS GOOD: The midterms’ estimated cost of $3.67 billion, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, is higher than the GDPs of countries like Liberia, Central African Republic, Eritrea, and the Maldives. 


  • DOUBLE TAKE: THIS SIGN ISN'T FROM THE SHAHEEN CAMPAIGN

    ABC's RON CLAIBORNE in New Hampshire finds an example of what looks like a dirty trick by opponents of Democrat Jeanne Shaheen: 

    Dirty tricks?
    by kreutzel via Instagram



  • MCCONNELL GETS PHOTOBOMBED

    ABC's BEN SIEGEL: You can’t win every vote.

    One Kentucky voter showed his disapproval for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell Tuesday when he ran into the senator at a Louisville polling location



    The campaign for McConnell’s opponent, Alison Lundergan Grimes, quickly turned the photo bomb into a messaging opportunity on Twitter. (The tweet, which has since been deleted, can be found on the Sunlight Foundation’s archive of politicians’ deleted tweets.)

    by Erin Dooley edited by Michael Falcone 11/4/2014 9:25:31 PM





  • ELECTION SPENDING IS HIGHER, BUT NOT BY MUCH. 

    ABC's CHRIS GOOD: House and Senate races in 2014 will cost $3.67 billion, the Center for Responsive Politics estimates. That’s higher than the $3.63 billion spent in 2010, and the $3.66 billion spent on congressional contests in 2012, but it’s not that much higher.

    Those totals don’t include undisclosed spending by groups like Americans for Prosperity, a 501c4 nonprofit that doesn’t report its election spending to federal campaign regulators. The Center estimates that money will be “well over” $100 million, so it’s tough to say how much the elections will really cost.


  • SPOCK JUST VOTED!



    by Erin Dooley edited by Michael Falcone 11/4/2014 8:34:26 PM


  • CONNECTICUT GOVERNOR’S CAMPAIGN FILES SUIT OVER VOTING DELAY

    ABC’s SHUSHANNAH WALSHE: Democratic Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy’s re-election campaign has filed suit to extend voting hours in Hartford, asserting that 12 polling stations failed to open on time as required by state law. The campaign will appear at Hartford Superior Court this afternoon in an attempt to have polls remain open in the heavily Democratic city one hour later -- until 9 p.m. Eastern. In their filing, the campaign says at least some of the polling places in the city of Hartford opened at 6 a.m. without voter lists and that delayed voting in some locations for between 30 and 90 minutes. They say Malloy, himself, had to wait for about 20 minutes to vote in the city that went about 90 percent Democratic in the last election.

    The campaign of Tom Foley, Malloy’s GOP challenger, disagrees with the filing: “There was more than enough time for people to vote, it is our understanding that the issues in Hartford were resolved by 7 a.m. and that there were still 13 more hours to vote. These types of maneuvers begin to erode confidence in the electoral process,” Foley press secretary Mark McNulty said in a statement

    The issue has even attracted the attention of President Obama, who called into a Connecticut radio station saying, “The main thing I just want to emphasize is it that we’ve got to make sure that those folks have the chance to vote. And I want to encourage everyone that is listening to not be deterred by what was obviously an inconvenience.”

  • KEG STANDS ARE TRENDING IN LOUISIANA

    ABC's JORDYN PHELPS: If Google search trends are any indication of what’s on voters’ minds, it would seem that keg stands are a top issue in the Louisiana Senate race.

    Google reports that “keg stand” is the fourth most searched term related to vulnerable incumbent Democrat Sen. Mary Landrieu in Louisiana.

    In September, Landrieu assisted a man in drinking from a keg stand at an LSU tailgating party and the incident went viral on social media.

  • WHAT TONIGHT’S RESULTS MIGHT SAY ABOUT AMERICA

    ABC’s GARY LANGER: While we watch the blow-by-blow of tonight’s returns, we might also step back and see what they say about where we’re at as a country. We’re in a recurring pattern of electing presidents, then, two years later, giving their party an especially hard kick in the shins. We re-elected G.W. Bush in 2004, then whomped his party for 30 House and six Senate seats in 2006. We elected Barack Obama in 2008, then whacked the Democrats for 63 House seats and six in the Senate in 2010. We re-elected Obama in 2012 – and look set to hit his party again.

    Midterm losses for the incumbent president’s party are the norm, but lately they’ve been super-sized. Beyond the well-documented differences in midterm turnout, it speaks to two realities: One, the public’s long-running economic and political discontent; and two – an outcome of that discontent – a decade-long departure from traditional political loyalties. Independents have outnumbered either Democrats or Republicans by a greater margin, and for longer, than we’ve ever seen before. That encourages political instability. Even with gradual economic recovery under way, Americans still are beaten down by the longest, deepest downturn since the Great Depression, and likewise disaffected from politics, with a broad sense that the system simply doesn’t work. From the government shutdown and the botched Obamacare rollout a year ago and on to the threats posed by everything from ISIS to Ebola, with economic anxiety overlaying it all, the public is just not seeing the solutions it seeks.

    Obama’s approval rating is low, but confidence in Congress and in both parties is lower still. The Republicans may benefit tonight by not being the Democrats, but beyond that, they don’t have much independent appeal. No one in Washington does, and that’s a big part of what the discontent – and the voting cycles it’s fueling – are all about.
  • North Carolina GOP U.S. Senate candidate, Thom Tillis, who is facing a close race against incumbent Democrat Sen. Kay Hagan got an Election Day boost today from none other than The Donald. Trump, who famously passed on a presidential bid in 2012, has been a fixture on the political speaking circuit ever since. Trump also tweeted his support today for New Hampshire Senate candidate Scott Brown:




  • BIDEN IMPLIES ORMAN MAY CAUCUS WITH DEMOCRATS

    ABC's ALEX MALLIN: Republicans looking to label Independent Kansas Senate candidate Greg Orman as a liberal Democrat in disguise got a little extra ammunition Tuesday from Vice President Joe Biden.

    According to video posted by the Republican National Committee on YouTube, Biden outlined to DJs from Connecticut radio station WPLR several ways he could see Democrats hold the Senate.

    “We have a chance of picking up an Independent, you know, who will be with us in the state of Kansas,” Biden said.

    Orman has not openly said who he will caucus with if elected over three-term incumbent Sen. Pat Roberts, but he has said he would caucus with any party that achieves a majority after Election Day.

    Asked in a White House Briefing Tuesday, Press Secretary Josh Earnest said he was not aware of any conversations between the White House and Orman, and didn’t verify the authenticity of the radio interview.

    “It’s my understanding Mr. Orman has not indicated which party he will caucus with,” Earnest said.

  • Who, When, Where - @facebook data visualizations of people responding when asked if they voted in #Election2014. http://pbs.twimg.com/media/B1nZy37IIAAh5XO.png





  • GREG ORMAN: 'YOU'VE GOT TO END THE GRIDLOCK'

    ABC's RICHARD COOLIDGE: After casting his vote today, independent Kansas Senate candidate Greg Orman said his campaign was "a tremendous opportunity for the voters of Kansas."

    "We feel great...we think we've run a really good campaign and we're excited about the opportunity to potentially represent Kansans in the United States Senate," Orman said. "We feel really good about where we are and just hoping people go out and vote today."

    "This campaign is really a tremendous opportunity for the voters of Kansas to send a message to the politicians of both sides in Washington that you've got to end the gridlock. You've got to roll up your sleeves, get to work and start solving problems for the American public and we're really hopeful that the voters of Kansas will send that message today," he added. 

    Orman hasn't announced whether he'd caucus with the Democrats or the Republicans -- so if he wins, both parties will be vying for his support. 





  • MCCONNELL 'FEELING GOOD'

    ABC's JEFF ZELENY: Sen. Mitch McConnell arrived at his polling place in Louisville at 11 am, waving and smiling as he walked inside.

    "I'm feeling good," he said.

    He showed his driver's license, received his ballot and spent the next five minutes filling it out. His wife, Elaine Chao, had to wait a bit. She left her ID in the car, but an aide quickly fetched it for her.

    As he stepped outside, McConnell fought through a crush of cameras and made his way back to his SUV.

    "I think we're going to have a good day here in Kentucky and hopefully around the country," McConnell said. I'm hoping we're going to have a new majority to take America in a different direction. We'll find out tonight."


  • BOEHNER: 'I FEEL GOOD ABOUT THE CHANCES OF WINNING THE UNITED STATES SENATE'

    ABC's JOHN PARKINSON: After voting this morning, Speaker Boehner told reporters he feels good about the GOP’s chances to pick up the Senate majority and add to his House majority. He also predicted that voters are going to “send a very clear message to the president and Democrats in Washington that the American people want us to focus on their priorities.”

  • Video: 5 Crazy Election 2014 Scenarios That Might Actually Happen

    ABC NewsABC’s RICK KLEIN and JEFF ZELENY: Think today is the end of the election season? That you can go to bed tonight and wake up knowing who controls the Senate? Think again. There’s virtually no chance that all the close Senate races will be settled today. From runoffs to recounts, wild-card independents to wild-salmon fishermen mailing ballots in Alaska, there are multiple scenarios that will leave us up all night -- and then some.
  • IN GEORGIA, WHAT GOES DOWN COMES BACK UP

    ABC's CHRIS GOOD:
    Georgia’s online polling-place finder went down for about 90 minutes on Election Day, according to the office of Rep.
    John Lewis, D-Ga. Here’s a .gif of how the site’s non-performance: http://bit.ly/1Abrdo5. The site seems to be up and running now
  • ONE THING THAT WINNING -- AND LOSING -- PARTIES SHOULD REMEMBER (BUT WILL PROBABLY FORGET)

    ABC's RICK KLEIN: If there's anything to rejoice over at the end of this campaign -- a campaign that was at times about nothing, other times about everything, and was impossible to avoid if you live in a state with a hot or even warm race -- it's that it remains truly close at the finish line. As many as two dozen statewide races go into today without a clear winner; it's still possible more Republican governors lose than do Democratic senators.

    There's a larger point in this that winning (and losing) parties should remember, but will probably forget: This is a divided country that is shifting allegiances but not conveying loyalties. Mandates will not exist, and probably can't exist for a while in this kind of environment. That means it's particularly easy to over-read messages being sent by the voters - which then lengthens this extraordinary period of wild back-and-forths. If you're a student of the game, it sure can be a frustrating one to figure out. But enjoy the ride.


  • MICHELLE OBAMA STARS IN LAST-MINUTE WEB VIDEO FOR MARY LANDRIEU

    ABC’s JORDYN PHELPS: First Lady Michelle Obama offered her support to Sen. Mary Landrieu in an Election Eve web video, encouraging people to go out and vote for the embattled Democrat today. Landrieu's bid for a fourth term in the Senate is considered one of the tightest races in the country and could determine control of the Senate.
     
    "Mary Landrieu has always been there for the people of Louisiana, and I hope you will commit to being there for her in this year's election," the First Lady, who has been referred to as "the closer"  on the campaign trail for her ability to rally the party base, said in the video.

  • AN EARLY LOOK AT THE EARLY VOTE

    ABC’s ALI WEINBERG: Before polls even opened today, Americans officially surpassed the 2010 early vote by just over 300 thousand votes – the number currently stands at 19,413,257. But despite more Americans voting early, experts don’t expect the overall turnout rate to go up much, with some predicting 90 million voters overall – around the same number that voted in 2010 – with increased participation in some hot Senate races around the country.

    Speaking of those hot races, some secretaries of state are also giving their predictions for turnout within their states, with many projecting participation comparable to or greater than 2010’s rates. Arkansas’ Mark Martin predicts 51% of registered voters participating, versus 47 percent in 2010, while New Hampshire’s William Gardner predicts an uptick of a few thousand voters this year versus 2010. Meanwhile the secretaries of state in Kentucky (Alison Grimes, who’s also the Democratic Senate hopeful) and Kansas (Kris Kobach) also predict the same turnout percentage as in 2010: 49 percent and 50 percent, respectively.


  • Video: A Look at the Key Battleground States in the 2014 Midterm Election

    ABC NewsToday on “Good Morning America,” ABC’s JONATHAN KARL took us on a tour of today’s key battleground states where Republican candidates are attempting to tie their Democratic opponents to a “politically toxic” President Obama. If you really want to know whether Republicans will take control of the Senate, watch three states: Colorado, Iowa and Kansas. In Colorado, where Obama accepted the Democratic nomination for president in 2008, Republican Cory Garnder has a slight edge in the polls and in the early vote over incumbent Democratic Sen. Mark Udall.  In Iowa, the state widely considered to have birthed Obama, the race is neck-and-neck between Democrat Bruce Braley and hog-castrating Republican Joni Ernst. The real wild card is Kansas, where incumbent Republican Sen. Pat Roberts is fighting hard to keep his seat from independent candidate Greg Orman. An Orman victory could spark an all-out bidding war: he hasn’t said whether he’d caucus with the Republicans or the Democrats. 
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